Different Versions of English Language

Some of the varieties of English language are well developed and have standard form of grammar, thus are identified as Standard English, for instance Australian English. Whereas some varieties of English are in the developmental stage, thus they are identified as Standardizing English, for instance East Asian English.



Cambridge Encyclopedia of World English has listed eight major versions of English language. These varieties of English language are standardizing as well as standard.

East Asian English: English used in the east Asian countries like Japan, China, Malaysia, the Philippines etc. East Asian English is still developing.

South Asian English: A regional variety of English used in the south Asian countries such as India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Pakistan etc. South Asian English is still in developmental stage, thus, identified as standardizing English.

Australasian English: A variety of English used in Australia and New Zealand. Australasian English (also called Australian English) is in developed form, thus identified as Standard English.

British and Irish English: A variety of English used in England, Scotland and Welsh. British and Irish English is Standard English. It has a formal rules of grammar and language.

African English: English used in Nigeria, Ghana, and South Africa. African English is standardizing in some countries such as South Africa and in development phase in other countries.

Caribbean English: English used in Caribbean nations such as (Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago. Caribbean English is stilling developmental phase.

American English: A Standard English known as Network Standard in the United States. American English also includes Black Vernacular.

Canadian English: A standard English used in Quebec, Nunavut, and Newfoundland.



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  • Comments

    1. Profile photo of shaloo walia
      shaloo walia

      And then there’s Hinglish!!!a blend of Hindi and English, in particular a variety of English used by speakers of Hindi, characterized by frequent use of Hindi vocabulary or constructions.

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        Hinglish and Chinglish (Chinese + English) are categorized as South Asian English and East Asian English respectively.

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        African English is standardizing English, which means it is still in developmental stage.

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        Looks like every non-English speaking country has its own English

    2. Profile photo of Peter B. Giblett
      Peter B. Giblett

      There may be some regional variations in how the English language is used across the globe (including more regional dialects in the UK than any other part of the world) but there is actually only one language, one set of rules of grammar that we must adhere to. One of the problems with the English language is it being forgiving which leads to people taking liberties with the language.

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        That’s why English is also called The Queen’s English.

    3. Profile photo of Peter B. Giblett
      Peter B. Giblett

      I think you misunderstand – “The Queen’s English” relates to a specific accent, that of upper crust, well to do, aristocratic peoples. The BBC call the language they instruct their reporters to use Queen’s English, but it is only a rough approximation..

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        That’s true, but by “The Queen’s English,” I was emphasizing that the language was developed in England and rest of the versions were developed from this “Queen’s language”

    4. Profile photo of Kyla Matton Osborne
      Kyla Matton Osborne

      This is a really interesting topic, especially since I love languages. But I have to say, in all the years I have studied grammar and linguistics, I have never come across the expression “standardizing English” nor can I locate any internet content that uses the phrase the way you do. I’d love to know if this is just your opinion, or if you have an actual source that points to such a classification for the English spoken in countries where English is not the mother tongue of many citizens.

      I don’t know where you get the idea that Canadian English is only seen in three of our 13 provinces and territories, but I am here to tell you that it can be found from “coast to coast to coast.” And of course, there are regional dialects – particularly in Quebec, where French is the mother tongue of most people.

      As for “Network Standard,” that’s more of a question of eliminating regional accents than it is a standardization of American English.

      1. Profile photo of Vinaya
        Vinaya Post author

        My article is based on Cambridge Encyclopedia of World English.

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